The House Fiscal Cliff Vote and Postal Reform

Last night the House of Representatives voted 257-167 voted to approve legislation that prevented the United States from going over the fiscal cliff.   While the substance of the legislation approved had nothing to do with the Postal Service, the vote itself illustrated why postal reform died in the 112th Congress.

The 257 yea votes included 172 Democrats and 85 Republicans.    The list of Republicans that voted for the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff includes many Republicans that have either expressed opposition to H.R. 2309, the approach promoted by Congressmen Darrell Issa and Dennis Ross or expressed support for the approaches similar to what passed in the Senate.  So it would appear that there was areal House majority for postal reform along the lines of S.1789 in the 112th Congress.

The problem is that the Republican leaders on postal issues and for that matter most Republicans in the House of Representative are not part of the majority that would support a postal reform measure in the House that could pass the Senate.

It took a potential political disaster for Republicans to allow an up-or-down vote on the fiscal cliff legislation in what appeared to be a nearly leaderless House of Representatives.  The following tweet sums up the problem of legislating in this manner.

As the composition of the 113th Congress is nearly identical to the 112th, postal stakeholders should realize that passage of postal reform will require a crisis nearly as great as the fiscal cliff.   As such a crisis will come only after the Postal Service totally runs out of cash and stops deliveries, it makes more sense to pay attention to Postal Service cash levels than statements from members of Congress to estimate when Congress will finally act.

The 257 yea votes included 172 Democrats and 85 Republicans.    The list of Republicans that voted for the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff includes many Republicans that have either expressed opposition to H.R. 2309, the approach promoted by Congressmen Darrell Issa and Dennis Ross or expressed support for the approach passed in the Senate.

 

and why the prospect for postal reform in the 113th Congress rem

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